3 Smart Tips That Reduce Wear and Tear On Your Cornhole Sets

Posted by All American Tailgate on 28th Oct 2014

3 Smart Tips That Reduce Wear and Tear On Your Cornhole Sets

Remember those awesome runners you bought two summers ago? It’s probably time to retire them. And as for that laptop you bought four years ago? It’s probably time for that to go too. Wear and tear is a fact of life, and all our goods reach a point where they’re not as functional (or perhaps not even in one piece) anymore. It’s sad but true, and you have to accept it when the time comes.

Cornhole sets are no different, but you can do a lot to keep them in healthy shape for a longer period of time. Assuming you take good care of them now, you probably don’t have to worry too much. If you’re not the “high maintenance” type, there’s no need to fret since there are methods you can employ to reduce the damage to your boards.

Find a Safe Haven

The first thing to consider is storage. Where you keep your cornhole sets plays a big part in how they will look and function. After all, if you stash your board among items that can scrape or puncture the wood, you won’t be too pleased when you take it out in the future. The way you care for it (which we’ll discuss soon) is important, but that hard work can go down the drain if you’re not doing your best to store it safely. Therefore, make the effort to keep it out of harm’s way.

Storage DO’S:

  • Keep it in a dedicated area – It’s important that you locate an area of your home where your equipment will be safe. It could be the basement, the garage, or your bedroom. Whatever room that may be, make sure that there is a space which you’ll use primarily for your cornhole goods.
  • Secure it in a place that’s accessible to you only – You may have kids, friends/family members and pets which you don’t want to get their hands or paws on. If that’s the case, make sure that you put your items in a spot where the others can’t reach or don’t know about. Hint: High shelves work well and you can even use a lockable vault (a bit extreme, but it’s on the table) if you’re very adamant about who gets to touch your set and who doesn’t.

Storage DON’TS:

  • Put near sharp objects – The last thing you want is a board that’s lacerated. You certainly wouldn’t want to walk to a game with that! So if you’re thinking that shed of yours with rusted tools is a good spot, think again. You’re better off finding a space that’s clear of sharp objects.
  • Place near sources of waterFinding the right storage space is essential for the safekeeping of your cornhole sets.Water and wood don’t mix. On an aesthetic level, water damage creates that unsightly stained look you might have seen in pictures of flooded homes. On a physical level, there are the rotting effects that could take hold and force you to find a new cornhole board altogether.

Give Them Some TLC

It’s important to treat your cornhole set as the cliche says, “your pride and joy”. It’s your baby. Kids can enjoy safety and comfort in a daycare, but they still need attention. Likewise, your equipment needs some occasional maintenance work to remain in tip-top shape. With that said, you don’t have to make it a full-time job.

How to Care for Your Cornhole Set:

  • Give it a good clean-up – The simplest thing you can do is keep your cornhole board free of dust and particles. A damp towel works well here, but you can always use a duster to collect the excess debris.
  • Give it a “touch up” – If your board sports a painted coating or poly coat, then don’t hesitate to touch it up every once in a while. Add some paint in the areas that start to fade, and treat the wood if it seems to be losing its shine. It’s purely an appearance thing, but it doesn’t hurt to own cornhole equipment that reflects your taste and elegance.
  • Make necessary repairs – If there are glaring issues with your board, then make immediate repairs. For example, you may need to adjust a plank that’s out of place to keep it stable. Whatever the cause, don’t stall! There’s no need to replace something that you can fix.

Be Picky With Who Handles Them

The third piece of advice to consider involves how others handle your cornhole set. Remember, not everyone will treat your items with the same care and effort that you will. Your best friend may truly respect you, but he/she may not know how to keep precious and treasured items in good condition. That doesn’t mean you need to find new friends, but it’s a good sign that you might have to keep your cornhole boards away from them.

Who NOT to Lend Your Items To:

  • People who lose things easily – If you decide to lend any cornhole items out, make sure that the individual doesn’t have a reputation for losing things. If you fail to do so, the outcome can be quite obvious…Avoid lending your cornhole items to Individuals who handle things in a rough manner
  • Those with rough hands – You know who these people are. They’re the ones who can break the unbreakable. Generally speaking, cornhole sets and all related items are constructed in a sturdy fashion. However, they are not completely immune to damage, so those who aren’t gentle with delicate objects should stay away from your board.

Long Live Your Cornhole Board

The right care will save you from having to buy another cornhole set too earlyThe reality is that if you play cornhole long enough, you’ll have to replace your board at some point. Yes, it’s unfortunate. However, a lot of people run their equipment to the “end” before it’s even necessary. They could enjoy many more years with their items if they put in a little time and effort in maintenance. Don’t be like them. Heed the advice listed above by storing and repairing your cornhole sets, and be choosy with who you lend them to. By doing so, you can be sure to save a few dollars down the road.

Looking for durable cornhole sets that will last you a long time? Check out our selection of awesome cornhole boards!

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